Waking Up and Awakening to Listening

Early this morning in our tree-shaded, ivy-covered, peacefully nestled home, I awoke to —

HAMMERING!

BANGING!

SA-A-A-WWWING!

It sounded like it was right in our backyard! I got out of bed, stared with my blurry, nearsighted eyes into the back yard from our upstairs window, and deemed nothing out of place.

Once dressed and downstairs, our dog and I explored the neighborhood. Sure, there were sounds, but they weren’t coming from our backyard at all. In fact, they were coming from a house that was being renovated down the street from the FRONT of our house! Activity hammered, banged, and sawed on every side of that house!

Sound is a funny thing, isn’t it? It can echo seamlessly around corners, under branches, up hillsides and behind bushes. Sometimes it takes a time to reach our ears. Determining exactly where it originates is sometimes a mystery.

Listening to the voice of God can be like that, I think. Sometimes I hear Him loud and clear and there is no question in my mind of his heart-piercing message. Other times, I’m not so sure, not so certain…

I was once in a wonderful class on prayer and the Psalms taught by a minister-friend of ours. Among the points I remember from that class is one insight he shared:

Sometimes awakening in the night isn’t just awakening in the night; it’s a time to meet with God.

What if we looked at all interruptions, all detours,

all misdirections like that?

If God is with us all the time, which–in Christ–He is, according to Matthew 28:20,

And behold, I am with you always, even to the end of the age,

and if He plans our way, orders our days, determines our steps, as He does according to Psalm 37:23,

The steps of a man are ordered by the LORD, when he delights in His way

as well as in Psalm 31:14 and 15:

You are my God; my times are in your hand

and in Psalm 23:4:

Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for You are with me; Your rod and Your staff, they comfort me,

Then He does seek communion with us at all times.

So, let’s see that red light during our commute as a call to stop whatever keeps us from peaceful trust in His sovereignty in our lives. Let’s just lay it down like the painted lane divider right on the asphalt. May we answer the baby’s midnight cry as a time to comfort that little one and be comforted over our deepest fears by our heavenly Father. Let’s watch the clear water in the sink pour over sudsy, dirty dishes or in the driveway over a sudsy, dirty car and may it remind us of God’s full washing away of our sins in Christ. Let’s thank Him and praise Him as that water runs clear.

Remember our Savior has a purpose for us, and He even has a purpose for the pauses of our day:

May our days and nights be communion with Christ.

 

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3 Ways to Not Miss Out

This photo of our trusty dog and an open Bible shows the usual way my morning starts. A walk up and around our street together follows. But sometimes it’s raining  (like today) and we don’t go on a walk. Even more disruptive to my outlook and thinking is the reality that sometimes my morning doesn’t start that way at all. It’s like I jumpstart the day–diving right into the whitewater rush of activities. I let other details and pressing To-Do’s crowd out that most important time.

It seems we all have long lists of To-Do’s that clamor for our attention and time. Grocery shopping, doctors’ appointments, meals to prepare, opportunities to volunteer, car pool lines to wait in, bills to pay, dogs to wash, bathrooms to clean, unending piles of laundry… Whew! It’s exhausting to even think about sometimes, isn’t it–or at least it seems that way to me!

I’m a dedicated list maker and have succumbed some times to even putting the most mundane item–like “Get Mail”–on the list so I’ll be able to cross at least something out. That’s pretty pitiful, isn’t it?!

Many years ago, I read a little pamphlet entitled “Tyranny of the Urgent.” I don’t know who wrote it, but its wisdom has stayed with me. The pamphlet spoke about how we pay attention to the urgent things in life and sorrowfully neglect the important things in life. That’s a personal challenge to this list-maker. I’m usually reminded of that on my way up the driveway with the mail! I really miss uninterrupted time with God, reading His Word, and prayer.

In the mornings this month(or at least on most mornings), I’m reading through the Psalms in groups of 4 or 5 day in a book that brings them together with thoughts to ponder at the close of each group. (It’s Psalms by the Day by Alec Motyer and available at Christianbook.com.) Yesterday I had that time. The Psalms were wonderful and the thoughts were challenging, but what kept coming into my mind was our older neighbor next door, and I determined to go see her that morning.

And I did. And without our dog, so I could actually go in and visit a while.

I knocked on her door and she quickly answered. She was smiling and was dressed in cleaning clothes all spotted with paint.  She welcomed me inside and we sat in her living room. The vacuum sat still, tied up by its cord under the dining table behind us. She said she had just completed vacuuming and was expecting company the next day. As it turned out, a dear friend of hers from college days had unexpectedly died, and she had opened her home to several mutual friends to come and stay and all attend the funeral together. We remarked on the blessings of hospitality and friendship. Then she admitted that, as her friend had died suddenly, there were things she never had the opportunity to say to her. That was the true source of her sadness and the underlying reason for her hospitality. She wanted to tell those friends how much she treasured them and even how much more Jesus treasured them.

That is an important To-Do.

Suddenly, a beep went off in the hall. She laughed and confessed that the beeping had been going on all morning–and was at a loss to stop it. I determined it was a smoke detector in the hall whose battery was depleted. She produced a step stool and a new battery–and borrowing her reading glasses–I climbed up, replaced the battery, and the beeping stopped. She was so appreciative and remarked how I must have come for that very reason. Only God knows.

The funny thing is that I was given so much more than I gave. It caused me to ask myself what have I left unsaid, undone, or unheeded?

That brings me back to the faithful friend at the top of the page. We are in his last days now. Our long walks have become short but sweet ones. Playtime has become more infrequent. But he still loves to rest beside me as I read the Bible and pray and write at my desk (where he currently is, as in the photo below), at the kitchen table, or outside on the deck.

So that will be an important To-Do. Not a grand thing in the scale of things, but a comfort to him. And it will also spur me on to a consistent and beautiful time with God.

Likewise, and even more so, remembering to check on my neighbors will be an important To-Do: building community and looking for ways to serve, weeds to pull, and lives to impact for Christ.

So here is the list I’ve made: the “3 Ways to Not Miss Out” on the important things in life:

  1. “But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well.” Matthew 6:33
  2. “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.” Matthew 22:37
  3. “Love your neighbor as yourself.” Matthew 22:38

And that sums up everything.

 

 

Spell Check or Challenge?

Hello all fellow computer users! Today is rainy here. It’s a good day to settle in with a cup of hot tea and get some of those necessary computer tasks completed.

Sounds like a gratifying prospect, right?

Well, truth be told, it’s been a challenge. I’m not too savvy with computers, but I’ve learned some perseverance from the trial today! James had it right, even in the tech world:

“Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you meet trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. And let perseverance finish its work, so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking in anything.” (James 1:2-4 NIV)

Now my problem today wasn’t a testing of faith as much as a testing of patience with a temptation to exasperation. All the same, what kind of witness to being “in Christ” would failing that test be?

Today the trial was with Spell Check. Spell Check is a wonderful program that helps catch most of our spelling errors. It’s a blessing really. My spelling is generally good. I get a little off when I type too quickly. But as I typed along today, I watched red lines appear under almost every single word that I typed.

Words like IS and MAKE.

The computer suggested IST and MACHEN.

The blessing had turned into a trial!

Blindly, I clicked on various categories in the tool bar and finally landed on the correct category to see Spell Check.

Bravely, I clicked on the Options button and would you know it?

My Spell Check had somehow switched to GERMAN!

I really don’t have a clue how this happened. Did the computer know that I’ve been reading a biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer lately? Had it searched my brain for any lingering, thin remnants of college German, (now limited to translations of “Open the door please” and “Where is the bathroom?”) Who knows? Computers! I had to laugh and, happily, I was able to change my Spell Check back to English.

Hmmm…that wasn’t really a James-worthy trial, was it? It was just a small hiccup, a pause and a smile. But even in that, fellow rainy day computer friends, we see the call to persevering in faith by maintaining a Godly attitude and perspective in our Christian walk.

“For the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation for all people, training us to renounce ungodliness and worldly passions, and to live self-controlled, upright, and godly lives in the present age, waiting for our blessed hope, the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ,” (Titus 2:1–13 ESV)

We are persevering, waiting for our blessed hope. The soft rain perseveres, composing a peaceful background song. My tea perseveres–my mug, full and steaming with a second brew from a bag of my favorite Earl Grey Supreme. And it’s back to persevering on the task at hand…

~ But I am overwhelmed with the faithfulness of God as we persevere:

Thank you, God, for this GOOD day.

Thank you for unexpected trials that give us pause and opportunities

to persevere and realign our definition of trials.

Thank you for rain.

Thank you for tea.

Thank you for computers and Spell Check.

Thank you for developing perseverance in each of us.

Thank you for our blessed hope–for Christ.

Dear friend, I pray your time today goes more smoothly than mine. Yet, if you are beset with a trial, may you persevere, knowing God is refining your spirit, and that we

“…count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus [our] Lord.” (Philippians 3:8 ESV)

 

The Weather, Reality, and Life

How’s your weather today? It’s bright and sunny here. Birds chirp. Bees buzz. Sounds like a warm day, right? It is now, but early this morning it called for long pants, long sleeves, and a light jacket!

Appearance isn’t always reality.

Aren’t we like that sometimes? We smile and laugh–all blue skies and golden sunshine. But our reality? It’s a downpour of fear, worry, and anger that only washes away our trust and peace.

Hmmm… Should that really be our reality as followers of Christ?

Let’s consider Paul’s reality as given in his 2nd Corinthians 11:23-28 “resume”:


PAUL

~ Servant of Christ Jesus ~

Experience:

  • Imprisoned repeatedly
  • Shipwrecked 3 times
  • Adrift in the sea 1 day/night
  • Flogged numerous times
  • Lashed 39 times on 5 occassions
  • Beaten with rods 3 times
  • Stoned 1 time
  • In danger from robbers, countrymen, and unfaithful friends

Characteristics:

  • Exhausted
  • In pain and without sleep
  • Hungry and thirsty
  • Cold and in rags
  • Given a “thorn in the flesh” to foster humility

Aim:

  • Concern for the church
  • Concern for the sake of Christ

As close as I come to Paul’s trials is being seasick once on a cruise ship. Lord, have mercy! My trials are nothing compared to Paul’s, so you’d think it would be easy for me to maintain his aim. Yet, am I continually concerned about the spiritual health of the church and my fellow Christians? Am I content in my circumstances and more concerned about others and the glory of Christ?

Paul wanted something, too. He wanted that thorn in the flesh, thought an eye problem, to be removed. He asked God for its removal three times and all three times God said no. In 2nd Corinthians 12, Paul records God’s words as,

My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.

Paul submits to God, saying,

Therefore I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me. For the sake of Christ, then, I am content with weaknesses, insults, hardships, persecutions, and calamities. For when I am weak, then I am strong.

Paul’s trust in Christ gave him a perspective that focused beyond his present circumstances. He realized when he had nothing, he had everything–he had Christ.

As we face our trials, may we also trust in Christ and be strong in Him. That will bring real peace, and–in the midst of storms–a bright, sunny day in our souls.

Smoke and Fire in the Smoky Mountains

No photo needs to adorn this loss. It’s been in the news so frequently:

Out of Control fires in the Smoky Mountains and Surrounding Areas and Towns

And it raged on for days. While a good breeze and strong winds are sometimes a good and welcome turn in the weather, their timing in this area ended up having a disastrous influence on the fires. The winds exacerbated the flames and destruction spread with reckless speed.

Sadly, many of the homes in the areas were fully consumed down to their foundations, leaving only a lonely fireplace/chimney standing amidst the smoking dust. My cousin’s beloved green cabin was one of the casualties. In it mementoes and treasures were also consumed.

Then at last rains came. What a welcome they were, helping turn the tide of the remaining fires.

The fires have taken such a toll–both physically and mentally. When I first heard of the fires, my heart went out to all who were in the affected areas–the homeowners, the native animals, the firefighters. My prayers went up like the smoke with a request for rain and peace.

Then I remembered a favorite poem from years ago. I’ll share it here in hope that the perspective of this wise and historic Puritan poet might be a comfort to those who have suffered such a loss.

The poem is entitled “Verses upon the Burning of our House, July 10th, 1666.” Its author is Anne Bradstreet, one of the first female poets on what would years later become American soil. She was born in England in 1612 and immigrated with her husband and parents to the American colonies with the Winthrop Puritan group, settling in Massachusetts. There, she and her husband raised eight children and moved four times finally making a home in North Andover, Massachusetts. By then, many of her relatives (both older and younger than she) had passed and Anne herself was suffering from failing health, most probably tuberculosis.

It is this fourth house that burned to the ground. In the poem, she speaks of her loss and her memories, and she honestly recounts her regret. Even so, at the poem’s close, her pain and loss are overwhelmed by her faith in God and reliance on Christ. May God strengthen us to face loss with a similar perspective.

Be encouraged (and kindly be understanding of the 17th century speech and spelling):

“Verses upon the Burning of our House, July 10th, 1666”
 
“Here Follows Some Verses Upon the Burning
of Our house, July 10th. 1666. Copied Out of
a Loose Paper.
In silent night when rest I took,
For sorrow near I did not look,
I wakened was with thund’ring noise
And piteous shrieks of dreadful voice.
That fearful sound of “fire” and “fire,”
Let no man know is my Desire.
I, starting up, the light did spy,
And to my God my heart did cry
To straighten me in my Distress
And not to leave me succourless.
Then, coming out, behold a space
The flame consume my dwelling place.
And when I could no longer look,
I blest His name that gave and took,
That laid my goods now in the dust.
Yea, so it was, and so ‘twas just.
It was his own, it was not mine,
Far be it that I should repine;
He might of all justly bereft
But yet sufficient for us left.
When by the ruins oft I past
My sorrowing eyes aside did cast
And here and there the places spy
Where oft I sate [sat] and long did lie.
Here stood that trunk, and there that chest,
There lay that store I counted best.
My pleasant things in ashes lie
And them behold no more shall I.
Under thy roof no guest shall sit,
Nor at thy Table eat a bit.
No pleasant talk shall ‘ere be told
Nor things recounted done of old.
No Candle e’er shall shine in Thee,
Nor bridegroom‘s voice e’er heard shall be.
In silence ever shalt thou lie,
Adieu, Adieu, all’s vanity.
Then straight I ‘gin [again] my heart to chide,
And did thy wealth on earth abide?
Didst fix thy hope on mould’ring dust?
The arm of flesh didst make thy trust?
Raise up thy thoughts above the sky
That dunghill mists away may fly.
Thou hast a house on high erect
Frameed by that mighty Architect,
With glory richly furnished,
Stands permanent though this be fled.
It‘s purchased and paid for too
By Him who hath enough to do.
A price so vast as is unknown,
Yet by His gift is made thine own;
There‘s wealth enough, I need no more,
Farewell, my pelf [money], farewell, my store [possessions].
The world no longer let me love,
My hope and treasure lies above.
Source: The Columbia Anthology of American Poetry (Columbia University Press, 1995)

Squeaks, Creaks, and Clicks and Other Unusual Sounds

The view from my desk looks out onto the deck and across our back yard. I love the natural light, the birds, the trees–even all the fallen leaves like reminders of blessings at this time of year. Today, I was happily typing along on another project (an inexorable book submission proposal) and I kept hearing the oddest clicking sound.

Does your house make funny sounds? Our house is an older one, so funny sounds do echo about now and then. Certain floorboards creak an achy “Hello” when I walk over them. One light switch in particular makes a loud, grouchy CLAP when I switch it on like it would much rather continue sleeping in darkness. Even our newer washer and dryer call out their own version of a Revolutionary War song each time a cycle ends. It’s a rollicking time!

But this was a new sound. Of course, at first I thought it was a drip in the sink. Nothing stirring there–not even a soap bubble. Was our family’s furry friend chewing on squeaky toy or a crinkly Hershey bar wrapper? No, he was dozing in the sun on the hall rug.

Still the clicking continued–and so the plot thickened.

Into the kitchen, I went. Yes, I’d completely turned off the gas on the stove after heating my lunch. (It was vegetable soup–wish you could’ve joined me!) The clock on the shelf was quietly ticking, definitely not clicking.

I headed back to my little desk, flustered and out-of-ideas, and sat down in the chair. My eyes drifted out across the narrow deck, to the ivy,

AND THERE HE WAS!  (And then he wasn’t.)

img_3248The cutest little chipmunk ever. (Aren’t they really all cute and little!) I’m afraid you’ll have to imagine the little imp, just to the right of the fern, nestled in the leaves, and looking straight at me, for he turned and dashed right into the ivy in a blink. Guess he had been carrying on an in-depth conversation and telling tales of the best nut storage spots and the latest news from the acorn beds–all with no one attentively listening. That’s rather sad really.

There’s a listening time that could be even sadder though–for each of us. There have been times I’ve missed “the still small voice” of God, as I busily made my own decisions, pursued my own designs. Ever found yourself in that same position?

Now I’m not equating God or Jesus with a chipmunk, even though the Maker did create them. It’s just that finally locating that click-happy, verbose chipmunk made my ears perk up.  It made me remember that sometimes I need to look and listen–

to REALLY LOOK–at God’s Word and

to REALLY LISTEN–to the words of Jesus Christ.

“Come to me…” (Matthew 11:28)

“Abide in me…” (John 15:4)

And that brings us to a beautiful promise: “…rest unto your souls.” Matthew 11:29)

I don’t know about you, but I could really use some rest for my soul!

Every concern. Every worry.

Every dream. Every desire.

Every minute. Every hour.

Every day. Every night.

Come to Jesus and receive His promise.

Abide in Him and know His rest, His peace.

Thank you, Lord!

(And thank you also, Lord, for intriguing sounds and bashful chipmunks that bring out thoughts back to You.)

God, Slow Me Down!

Have you heard the song “A Future Not My Own” by Matt Maher? He is a favorite Christian musician of mine and the song is on his Saints and Sinners album. In the song, Maher asks God to slow him down, pleads with God to chase his heart of stone, describes love as “a long and narrow road,” and concedes that we see only the beginning, but God sees the end. Then he goes on to cry what we all echo–the need “for a future not my own.” You can click on the song title to hear the actual song in another window: “A Future Not My Own”

I listened to that cd yesterday and, again, today.

As it turned out, yesterday I needed a little slowing down myself. My husband and I were on-the-go from morning through evening, happily running errands and doing various acts of service. It was exhilarating–until it came time to sit still in a class that evening. God slowed me down! Then I realized, “I’m exhausted!” That class was a sweet peace and, overall, it was a full and rich gift of a day.

This morning, the thoughts in that song fit in beautifully with my Bible study. Several dear sisters in Christ and I are doing the Beth Moore Entrusted study on 2nd Timothy. It’s a blessing. In this morning’s study, we were instructed to read a passage in 1st Timothy. 1st Timothy 1:5, to be exact. (I don’t think I’d ever soaked in that single verse before, scurrying on instead to verse 12 and beyond. Here it is from the ESV:

 The aim of our charge is love that issues from a pure heart and a good conscience and a sincere faith.

So, over and over from yesterday through today, from a cd selection to errands and activities to my Bible study, I was hearing about love.

Love is the long and narrow road–the path set before me by my Lord. (Proverbs 16:9, 20:24; Jeremiah 10:23)

♥ Love is the impetus, the driving force for all action. (John 3:16)

♥ Love is the result of a pure heart, a good conscience, and a sincere faith. (1Timothy 1:5)

♥ Love is the inevitable reaction of knowing Christ. (1 Corinthians 13:1-13)

Now, I’m not sure where you are, dear reader, but I’m not on a dirt road in Ephesus. So what does that love look like–what could it look like–on the asphalt roads in my life?

As I thought about how love could be the aim of all we do, I suddenly realized that LOVE ~

not the . . .  eb52c020-c145-440c-8445-911f133c0096

  or the . . .  hershey-almond

 

~ was the energy that propelled me to do all the things God gave me opportunity to do.

♥ God’s love for me propelled Him to send Christ.

♥ Christ’s love for His Father and for us propelled Him to suffer on a cross.

♥ My love for God and Christ propels me to love them with all my heart, soul, and mind–and my neighbor as myself. (Matthew 22-:36-40)

Yes, as Maher’s song recites, “love is a long and narrow road.”

That road will undoubtedly include green pastures, dark valleys, desolate ravines, and mountaintops. What lies around the corner? Only God knows where our love for Him will take us–there’s that “future not our own”.

Yet through it all, isn’t it a deep peace and an uncontainable joy to know that God has set our path before us, that our times are in His hands? Metaphorically, our names are written on the palm of his hand. (Isaiah 49:16) We rest and sing under the shadow of His wing. (Psalm 57:1, 63:7) He is faithful to be with us, and every step is a step closer to being with Him forever. Then we’ll worship at the feet of the one who loved us so much that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in Him may have eternal life!

What love?!!

That’s something to sing about and to go about with in our heart~

And dear friend, here’s hoping God crosses our paths ♥

“He Restores My Soul”

IMG_3198.jpgOur home has a small but lovely back yard and a wooden deck. I love the sound made when I walk across that wooden deck. Don’t know why! There are big maple trees towering overhead that offer bounteous shade and a sprinkling of autumn’s fall leaves. There’s a little table and two chairs, perfect for a quiet conversation. (We could enjoy some time together there, couldn’t we?) There’s a bench where I like to spread out my tea, my Bible, and my laptop. Here and there, flowers bloom in large pots. A rosemary bush scents the air. It’s beautiful to me. 

There’s just one problem:

When on the deck, there is NO internet connection!

(Cue thunder and threatening music.)

This might not seem like a terrible turn of events, and—in the big picture—it really isn’t. But at the moment, it was.

First, I grumbled, but of course, that didn’t do any good!

Then I decided to be pro-active and tried to s-t-r-e-t-c-h the internet booster out onto the deck. Sadly, the connection lines weren’t long enough. Technologically foiled!

So I took the only option there seemed to be. I closed the laptop and just sat there–on the bench, sipping my mug of hot tea.

img_3199

Have you ever felt like God just lit up His will in neon lights right in front of you?

Well, there weren’t any neon lights on the deck, and there was no special message in the Cape Cod towns written on my mug. It was Psalm 23, the Lord’s Prayer; it flooded my mind, especially verses 1-3:

“The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters. He restores my soul.”

Last week was close to overwhelming (although I’m sure it wasn’t the “valley of the shadow of death” David writes of in verse 4 of Psalm 23). I did, however, feel like I was barely keeping my head above water. Have you had weeks like that? Not that I wish that for you, of course, but I hope you can empathize! The activities were mostly good ones, but they were numerous:

  • Work
  • Grocery shopping
  • Meal prep
  • Bible study
  • Walk the dog
  • Run errands
  • Clean bathroom
  • Paint upstairs trim
  • Purchase fall plants
  • Plant fall plants
  • Pick up ordered items
  • Help a friend
  • Tutor students
  • Do laundry
  • Entertain friends
  • Write letters
  • Make phone calls
  • Do Sunday school preparation and
  • Clean rug (Our dog got sick on our family room rug—bring on the baking soda.)

There were some hard decisions in there, too. Throughout the week, I had prayed and prayed for direction and for peace, and I prayed that wordless cry of the soul that wells up from deep inside you, accompanied only by tears.

But this was different. There were no tears now.

I sat.

I took a deep breath of fresh air.

I watched a small nuthatch at the bird feeder.

I watched a hummingbird seek out one of our last geranium blossoms.

I felt the soft breeze drift over me, gentler than cashmere,

I heard the rustling tree branches overhead.

I heard the plunk of hickory nuts falling on and rolling down our neighbor’s roof.

I smelled the sweet, complex scent of my tea. (Sloane Tea’s “Heavenly Cream”—seriously!)

I released the worry and stress I had worn like accessories, increasingly added throughout the week.

I loosened my grip on my list of self-imposed “to-do’s” and thought about what was really most important—to love the Lord my God with all my heart, with all my mind, and with all my soul and to love my neighbor as myself. (Matthew 22: 34-40)

Now this isn’t brain surgery, but once I took my eyes off that list of self-determined to-do’s, I could sense the complete sufficiency of Jesus which superseded the whole list. Decisions and priorities became clear.

The Lord restored my soul.

Only then, did I come back inside, jot down some notes, and then pop back out and snap a couple photos.

Now it’s time to give my Mom a call and text a couple of college students. Then, I’ll make a second attempt at rug cleaning! The laundry, painting, and planting can wait for another time.

May the Lord restore you, too, dear friend!

For Deeper Insight. . .

A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Mass Market Edition - By: W. Phillip Keller I heartily encourage you to check out A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, by W. Phillip Keller.

It’s an eye-opening book that unpacks the 23rd Psalm in an accurate, contextual, and most meaningful way. (It is also undoubtedly one of my favorites!) It makes a wonderful gift at Easter or anytime.

It’s available in many formats. Here’s the link to read more about it and purchase it at Christian Book Distributors: A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23 by W. Phillip Keller 

The Last Day of Summer

I am at a loss. Why? The end of summer is upon us! The month has dwindled down to a drop–

a day.

img_3186

Today, Wednesday, September 21, is THE LAST FULL DAY of summer.

More precisely,

(with a little help from “ye” Old Farmer’s Almanac)
Old Farmer's Almanac

tomorrow–Thursday, at 10:20 AM–is the last moment of this summer.

Gone are the days of. . .

ice cream Image result for ice cream cone

Image result for lazy summer morning lazy mornings

being poolside, dockside, or beachside Image result for public domain lake with dock and chair

Image result for chasing fireflies public domain  chasing lightning bugs

overflowing gardens  Image result for bountiful flower bed public domain

Image result for jumping through sprinklers public domain  jumping through sprinklers

barefoot walks in soft green grass  Image result for public domain feet walking in grass

Image result for watermelon slice public domain  watermelon

fresh tomatoes   Image result for beefsteak tomatoes public domain

But weren’t they wonderful? (And who says ice cream is only for the summer? I have a dear aunt who would strongly concur!)

I hope you were able to enjoy some special times this past summer, dear friend. Did your garden bloom beautifully? Did your friends rejoice with you? Did you share sparkling morning sunlight and evening starlight with someone special? Did you walk increasingly more closely with Jesus?

Among His many characteristics, God is a god of relationship. Look at the friendships of David and Jonathan, of Paul and Barnabas and Timothy. Look at the marriages of Adam and Eve, of Abraham and Sarah, and of Joseph and Mary. Look at the kinship of Jesus and His cousin, John. Look at the bonds between Jesus and the apostles–and Jesus and you.

Relationships span time and seasons. They are important, in every season. So, let’s be thankful for the summer days we enjoyed and praise God for those moments and memories.

But what about difficult days? Have the hottest summer days been accompanied by trying and soul-strengthening trials? Have you been through a personal summer thunderstorm?

If in this past summer you experienced some bitter or difficult times, remember God does not leave us without comfort. We have His Word. We have His ear. We have His Spirit. We have those relationships. Like that gangly last tomato plant, continue to lean on the firm support that only Jesus Christ is. He came and died and rose making that relationship possible–all for you!

Remember

  • how very much He loves you,
  • that He is in control, (and that He is in control), and
  • to humble yourself and concede, “Thy will be done.”

With that attitude, we can be thankful for the summer days and for the fall days just around the corner. We can look forward with great expectation to see the unfolding of His good and perfect plan for our lives. We can be encouraged to walk even more closely with Jesus as we enjoy. . .

Image result for fall leaves public domain Colorful leaves (and leaf piles to jump in!)

Uniquely shaped gourds and pumpkins Image result for pumpkins gourds public domain

Image result for public domain thanksgiving dinner Thanksgiving dinner

Hot mulled cider Image result for public domain mulled cider

Image result for public domain pumpkin pie Pumpkin pie, pumpkin bread, pumpkin butter, (pumpkin ice cream?)

Crisp air  Image result for public domain fall in the blue ridge

And when we don’t know what will happen or when we pray and pray and PRAY for something or someone–let’s commit to wait with expectant eyes to see the realization of the wonder that is God’s will.

Let’s be awed and amazed with. . .Image result for public domain fall heart leaf

each uniquely colored fall leaf,

Image result for public domain breath of mountain hiker  each breath of crisp air

Image result for public domain hands making heart shape

each day He gives us.

This is the day the LORD has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.” Psalm 118:24

Happy Sunday!

 

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Happy Sunday, dear friends! Whatever day you may have, know “This is the day that the LORD has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it!” (Psalm 118:24).

Have you been able to worship with fellow believers? I hope and pray so! That is the best of times and a glimpse of heaven.

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